America, Tear Down Your Monuments


After President Trump attempted to equalize the White supremacist protesters and counter protestors with his words in the now famous vehicular homicide at the protests in Charlottesville, VA, I was perplexed and somewhat amused by different people’s reactions.  

I was disappointed by Trump’s comments that he made from the lobby of Trump Tower but not shocked.  It’s as if some people forgot that America was founded on racism and that racism is still very strong in America institutionally and socially.  

Racism was written into the constitution (Blacks were 3/5 a person) and the brutal chattel slavery of Blacks was legal.  The first President George Washington was a racist and upheld slavery and so did President Thomas Jefferson.  So, Trump was right about one thing; If we took down the Robert E. Lee statue, we would have to take theirs down too.  

As a matter of fact I would argue that all presidents were racist, even up to recent times.  President Reagan was a raging racist who introduced drugs into inner cities to destroy the Black community.  President Clinton locked up more Black men than anyone with his legislation with laws like “3 Strikes.”  We saw how President Bush Jr. handled the Hurricane Katrina situation.  President Obama might be the only exception.  But, after all, he’s Black.  But even he could have done more for the African-American community.  And, yes, I understand he faced considerable resistance, but, I digress.  

People are acting so shocked that there is a White supremacist leading the White House when there has ALWAYS been one there.  Our public leaders and some of our citizens just know how to hide their racism for fear of condemnation due to our hard fought civil rights progress.  

America is a racist country.  There’s no two ways about it.  This country was founded and built on racism.  It’s about time we began dismantling this physical abstraction.  It is long overdue that we build a new America that lives up to its credo of liberty and justice for all.  We should be living up to morals of loving one’s neighbor as we love ourselves.  We should be a land where a man is “not judged by the color of his skin but by the content of his character,” as the great Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said.  These racist monuments are not just an eyesore, to some.  To many, they are a painful reminder of promises unfulfilled and so much wrong done.  As long as these monuments stand, people will stand for racism in America.  So, when it comes to tearing down statues of racist confederate leaders like Robert E. Lee and racist presidents like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, I say tear them down.  Tear them all down.  And let’s build a new America where there is true equality.

SZA’s In Ctrl

So, apparently, bougie Black chicks love SZA.  Well, so do big boss ass niggas because that album is fire.  SZA set the internet ablaze with her new album Ctrl, which debuted at #3 on the Billboard 200 chart.

I had a startling moment with Ctrl while I was getting dressed in my room one day.  I was entranced by her record “Broken Clocks,” I was playing it on repeat, when I noticed it was 12:34 p.m.   I looked up 1234 in numerology and it said that means change is coming, which is ironic because I had been struggling getting over my ex.  I know.  Sad.  But, this omen gave me hope.  So, if not for anything else, thanks SZA.

Otherwise, throughout the album, her raspy and smooth melodic voice is enchanting.  There’s an edginess and a mysterious, sultry tone and a realness to it as if she were a siren beckoning one to either tremendous pleasure or eternal damnation.  Musically, on Ctrl, I’ll go with the former.

This album is intensely personal and, on the first track, “Supermodel,” SZA brings you right into her insecurities right off the gate.  She lamented her ex-boyfriend “left her lonely for prettier women” and took a trip to Vegas without her on Valentine’s Day.  So, she “banged his homeboy” out of spite.  For shame.  I thought you were a good girl SZA.

On “The Weekend” she romanticizes being the side chick.  And, she expresses her urge to revel in love which she finally found on “Love Galore” opposite the rapping of Travis Scott.

Overall the album paints a concise picture of overcoming insecurities to the triumph of self-esteem.  And demonstrates the power of being vulnerable as a woman.

G.O.A.T.

With his thirteenth studio album, once again, Jay-Z changed the game.  As he did with his previous LP, Magna Carta Holy Grail, Hov set new rules.

4:44 is what grown man hip-hop sounds like.  To hell with ignorance and debauchery.  Jay-Z had an intimate conversation with his listeners.

The most amazing accomplishment of the album was on “The Story of O.J.” which is a critique of the hip-hop community’s fiscal responsibility and an instruction manual for accumulating wealth.  My highlight of the record is “You know what’s more important than throwing money away in the strip club?  Credit.”

This preaching is necessary for our hip-hop community which currently tends to value the appearance of having money over actually having money, which is backwards and ludicrous.  My father is a banker and taught me the value of money at an early age.  Yet, I still couldn’t resist the urge to pop bottles in the club during my youth due to the hip-hop narrative.  Somehow, blowing money equates to balling instead of saving it.  It doesn’t make sense.  I’ve been saying this for years and I’m ecstactic that our rap god, almighty Hov, proclaimed it from his mountain top.

Maybe now Blacks in the hip-hop community will think twice about blowing money and more about making their money grow, which will ultimately increase our stake in the marketplace and the power schematics.  That conversation and that narrative switch was so necessary.  And, it had long been overdue.

Aside from Jay-Z’s references to money and wealth, the most glaring content of the album is undoubtedly him admitting to cheating on Beyoncé on the title track “4:44.”  I don’t have much to say about it except that no matter how rich and powerful he is, as we’ve seen time and time again, a man is still a man.

Jay-Z is a mogul, but in his heart he is still a true artist, which is what made him successful in the first place and part of what sustains him.  My guess is, as an artist, he couldn’t resist the urge to bare his soul on the record.  For every true artist their work is their therapy.  It was probably cathartic for him confess his infidelity.  I’m not judging him for cheating or Beyoncé for staying with him.  Those issues are solely between them as a couple.

In terms of the production on the album, No I.D. totally hit the nail on the head.  His jazzy samples were so pleasing to the ear that they made Jay-Z’s baritone voice flow smoothly on the beat in a remarkably unified fashion.  I delighted in Jay-Z’s decision to forego singles in favor of a purely soulful concise presentation like a soundtrack to the educated and successful Black man’s life.  Jay-Z’s choice to use the legendary No I.D. as the only producer for the album proved to be an excellent decision.

A highlight of 4:44 was Jay-Z’s song “Bam,” which sampled the reggae classic, “Bam Bam” by Sister Nancy.  “Bam Bam” is one of the most sampled reggae songs of all time in hip-hop.  Released in 1982, a timeless record, “Bam Bam” still gets played in hip-hop and reggae clubs to this day.  No I.D. and Jay-Z’s use of the sample is my favorite utilization of “Bam Bam” by a hip-hop record thus far.  And, that’s quite a feat because there’s at least 29 other songs that sampled it.  On the track, the looping of the horns jumps out of the speakers with high energy.  It’s as if you can feel the “bam” from creation that Sister Nancy spoke of in her original record.  Jay-Z’s braggadocios baritone let it be known that his and his team’s ambition would not be denied, as it came from within as well as without.

With this album, Jay-Z earned my selection as G.O.A.T., Greatest Rapper Of All Time.  Really, the title should have already been his.  How is it fair to compare his actual body of work to Tupac and the Notorious B.I.G.’s hypothetical albums had they been alive?  They’re not.  And the fact is Jay-Z has done it time and time again.  And, this is, yet again, another number one album.

Jay-Z’s ability to set trends and change the narrative and the conversation is unparalleled.  That’s power.  Guys out here quote Jigga lines like the Bible.  Forget hip-hop, who else do you know in any arena with that type of influence?  Not many.  Aside from all the categories of lyrics, flow, delivery, wordplay, hooks, content, beat selection and authenticity in all of which Jay-Z is ranked near the top, if not at the top, it’s that je ne sais quoi that something you can’t describe that makes Jay-Z the G.O.A.T.  Like Jay-Z said a while back, “It’s just different.”

And, with 4:44, Jay-Z completely switched up his content to something more positive and beneficial to the Black community, as opposed to usual trap drug dealing, shoot ’em up, banged your girl records.  It had a jazzy and mature feel.  Yet, it still appealed to the mainstream, which so desperately needed a popular voice in hip-hop saying the right things.  Content-wise mainstream rap music had become so lopsided in terms of negativity.  Jay-Z’s album 4:44 was food for the soul.

With this album, we saw the evolution of Jay-Z from the smooth hustler getting re-upped on his first album in 1996 called Reasonable Doubt to the grown man talking about his legacy with his children in beyond.  It is Jay-Z’s longevity, versatility and growth that has made him the G.O.A.T.  You can argue whether or not he is a better rapper than the Notorious B.I.G. and 2Pac.  What you can’t debate is that he outlived them to make better music.

R.I.P. to a Legend

Somehow, he made hardcore gangsta rap into beautiful music that had mass appeal.  He made classic music in the golden age of hip-hop.  “Shook Ones Pt. II” will forever be considered one of the greatest contributions to the hip-hop Universe.  He will be so dearly missed.  R.I.P. Prodigy of Mobb Deep.  Tell Tupac and Biggie I said what up.